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Wednesday the 30th of June, 2004
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STAR SIGNS

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning,

Before we get into today's Daily Vitamin, I want to clarify a very important point about yesterday's content (a billion). As one of our recipients, José Antonio, pointed out:

"... a British billion used to be like the Spanish billion (which makes more sense by the way). Everything started to get wrong when the Financial Times adopted the American methodology!"

This is absolutely true, and I didn't include it. This has caused a lot of confusion in the English-speaking world. Thank you very much José Antonio!

***************************
The content of today's Daily Vitamin was suggested by Maite. Maite wanted to know the equivalent Zodiac signs in English. They are more or less the same. Here they are:

Capricorn
--> 22 December - 20 January

Aquarius
--> 21 January - 19 February

Pisces
--> 20 February - 20 March

Aries
--> 21 March - 20 April

Taurus
--> 21 April - 21 May

Gemini
--> 22 May - 21 June

Cancer
--> 22 June - 23 July

Leo
--> 24 July - 23 August

Virgo
--> 24 August - 23 September

Libra
--> 24 September - 23 October

Scorpio
--> 24 October - 22 November

Sagittarius
--> 23 November - 21 December

If you have any questions about these star signs, please don't hesitate to contact me.

Enjoy your day!


Tuesday the 29th of June, 2004
Rating (1 votes)

A BILLION

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning.

Did you know that a billion dollars is not the same as "un billón de dólares"?

Below is the number 1 billion in English:

1,000,000,000

In Spanish or Catalan, we would call this one-thousand million, but in English we call it one billion.

Notice, also, that the commas and the decimal points are used differently in English and Spanish, which we pointed out in the Daily Vitamin on February 10:

$1,355,425,582.67

This is one billion, three hundred and fifty-five million, four hundred and twenty-five thousand five hundred and eighty-two dollars and sixty-seven cents.

In Spanish it would be "one thousand three hundred and fifty five million...," and it would be written like this:

$1.355.425.582,67

If you have any questions about today's content, please don't hesitate to contact me.

Enjoy the rest of your day!


Monday the 28th of June, 2004
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TO ADVISE

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning. I hope you had a nice weekend, a long weekend for some of you.

The meaning of the English verb advise has nothing to do with the similar looking Spanish/Catalan word avisar.

Advise means: to give your opinion about the best thing to do in a certain situation.

Example 1
My broker advised me to buy shares in a mutual fund.

Example 2
Nancy's docter advised her to stop smoking.

Example 3
Matthew advised me to stay in contact with English in the summer.

This verb, then, is the equivalent of "aconsejar" in Spanish ("consellar" in Catalan). It does not mean "avisar." Do you know how to say "avisar" in English? The answer is after my Signature.

If you have questions about today's verb, I advise you to contact me.

Have a great day!


Wednesday the 23rd of June, 2004
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TO HAVE BUTTERFLIES IN YOUR STOMACH

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning.

Before we begin, I want to remind you that tomorrow and Friday there will be no Daily Vitamin because of the "Sant Joan" holiday.

Have you ever given a speech in front of a lot of people or participated in a high-pressure sporting event? How did you feel right before the event? Nervous?

Today's expression is: to have (or feel) butterflies in your stomach.

It means: to feel very nervous or excited about something important that you have to do.

Example 1
I remember the day of my wedding. Immediately before the ceremony, I had butterflies in my stomach.

Example 2
They say that before an important match, it's normal to feel butterflies in your stomach.

It's a very graphic expression; before an important event it really does feel like we have "mariposas" in our stomach.

If you have questions about today's expression, please don't hesitate to contact me.

Have a good day and enjoy your long weekend (those of you that have one).


Tuesday the 22nd of June, 2004
Rating (1 votes)

REVIEW OF MODAL VERBS-7 --> SHOULD

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning.

As we have seen over the last several days, there is a lot to say about modal verbs, and we have only just begun! However, today will be the last day that we will dedicate to this very important topic. Today we will look at should.

We use the modal verb should when we want to indicate that something is a good thing or a bad thing to do. We often use it together with the expression think.

1) I think you should accept the job.

1.1) You should accept the job.

Should is not as strong as must or have to.

2) You have to accept the job. (obligation)

So, we use should to talk about what is the right or wrong thing to do in a certain situation.

3) When you're in a library you shouldn't speak loudly.

4) If you would like to be rich, you should read the book "Rich Dad Poor Dad," by Robert Kiyosaki.

As you can see, should can be used to give advice. In example 3 we are indicating a social or societal norm, but in example 4 we are really giving advice, which is one of the most common uses of should.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, you should contact me.

Enjoy the rest of your day!