Tuesday the 23rd of July, 2019
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Tuesday the 22nd of March, 2005
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AMONG

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Good morning. Yesterday we looked at the word between. Between is usually used to refer to a quantity of two (two things, two people, two times etc.). Examples from Yesterday The deal between the two companies could lead to many opportunities for everybody involved. Jason is sitting between Brian and Ronald. Notice in the above examples, there is a relationship between two things. Today's word is: among Meaning 1: in the middle of or surrounded by a group of things or people. Example 1 I finally found my cat sleeping among my clothes. Meaning 2: to say that something or somebody is included in a larger group. Example 2 Our company is among the best places to work in the country, according to the results of a recent independent survey. Meaning 3: to say that something happens or exists within a group. Example 3 The use of new technologies is highest among younger generations. Meaning 4: to refer to a single group or a group of 3 or more people Example 4 There are no women among the speakers present at the conference. Example 5 The books were distributed among the class. I hope these examples help you to understand the main differences between between and among, Lilian and Roser. Thank you for your question. If anybody has any questions about these words, please don't hesitate to contact me. Have a good day!



Monday the 21st of March, 2005
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BETWEEN

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Good morning. I hope everybody had an excellent weekend! Today's Daily Vitamin is a request from Lilian L. (and also from Roser, who asked the same question last week). Lilian and Roser would like to know the difference between the words between and among. This is a very good question, and one that causes problems for Spanish and Catalan speakers since the translation of both words is entre. Today we will look at between and in tomorrow's Daily Vitamin we will deal with among. Today's word is: between Meaning 1: in the middle of two things or two people. Example 1: Jason is sitting between Brian and Ronald. Meaning 2: the period after one time or event and before another time or event. Example 2: I usually have a cup of coffee between classes to help me feel alert. Meaning 3: to show that two people, things, organizations or ideas have a relationship or are involved with each other. Example 3: Have you noticed the sparks (chispas) between Ellen and Greg? I think it could be the start of a romantic relationship. Example 4: The deal between the two companies could lead to many opportunities for everybody involved. Tomorrow we'll compare between with among. If you have any questions about these words so far, please don't hesitate to contact me. Enjoy the rest of your day!



Friday the 18th of March, 2005
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AT vs. IN (5)

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Good morning. Yesterday we looked at verbs with the prepositions AT and IN. Many adjectives also have dependent prepositions. This means that if you use the adjective with an object, you must use a preposition. Again, the best way to remember these prepositions is to learn them together with the adjective. And also, remember that after a preposition you must use a noun or a gerund (-ing verb form). Here are some expressions that use adjectives with the prepositions AT and IN: To be good or bad at something It means: to do something well or do something badly. Example: I am good at thinking of new ideas, but am bad at planning. To be hopeless or useless at something It means: to do something very badly, to show no ability or skill in an activity. Example: He is hopeless--useless at sport because he's very uncoordinated. To be angry at something--someone It means: to have negative feelings, to be annoyed. Example: I was angry at Alison for a week after our argument, but now we're friends again. To be interested in something--someone It means: to have a feeling that you want to know about something or someone. Example: The children are quite interested in the solar system. Why don't we take them to the planetarium? To be lacking in something It means: to say that something does not exist or is not available. Example: This town is lacking in some very basic services, such as primary schools, public transport and medical centres. To be disappointed in something--someone It means: to feel unhappy because something did not happen as you expected it would. Example: I was disappointed in the rock group's live performance. I love their records, but they didn't manage to transmit any of that energy during the concert. This week we have looked at how to use the prepositions AT and IN in many different ways. I hope we have answered your question satisfactorily, Susana. Thank you for sending us your request. If anybody has any questions about AT or IN or would like to ask us a question related to English, please don't hesitate to contact me. I hope you have a good day and a very relaxing weekend!



Thursday the 17th of March, 2005
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AT vs. IN (4)

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Good morning. Many verbs have dependent prepositions. This means that if you use the verb with an object, you must use a preposition. The best way to remember these prepositions is to learn them together with the verb. Remember that after a preposition you must use a noun or a gerund (-ing verb form). Here are some verbs with the prepositions AT and IN: To arrive at It means: to reach a place when you have come from another place, Example: When you arrive at the airport, park the car and go to the arrivals terminal. To look at It means: to direct your eyes at something or someone. Example: Can you look at what I've written to see if it's correct? To stare at It means: to look at someone or something very directly for a long time. Example: I hate it when people on the underground stare at me. I find it so rude! To succeed in It means: to achieve something you wanted or planned to do. Example: I finally succeeded in putting up the bookshelf, although the instructions were not easy to follow. To specialise in It means: to be an expert or to concentrate your studies in a particular area. Example: He specialised in international relations while he was studying political science at university. To participate in It means: to take part in something. Example: Would you like to participate in our theatre group? We meet every Wednesday night. Tomorrow we will look at some adjectives used with AT and IN. If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please don't hesitate to contact me. I hope you have a good day!



Wednesday the 16th of March, 2005
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AT vs. IN (3)

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Good morning. Today we will look at some expressions which include the prepositions AT and IN. To be at it It means: to say that someone is doing something that you don't approve of (spoken expression). Example: The children are at it again, chasing the cat and pulling its tail. At one's best--worst It means: to say that someone is showing their best or worst qualities. Example: At his best, Charles can be a very persuasive speaker. At his worst, he becomes dominating and dogmatic. While you're at it It means: to ask someone to do something while they are doing something else (spoken expression). Example: I see that you're going to call Ms Wilson. While you're at it, can you ask her if she received my e-mail? To be in on something It means: to take part in something that is being planned or discussed. Example: Nobody in the department was in on the decision to cancel the project. To have an in with someone It means: to have influence with someone. Example: I have an in with the director of human resources. Maybe I can get you an interview with him. Day in, day out; week in, week out, etc. It means: to do something continuously over a period of time (days, weeks, months etc.). Example: She quit her job because she was tired of doing the same thing at work day in and day out; she wanted more variety. Tomorrow we will look at some verbs used with AT and IN. If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please don't hesitate to contact me. Enjoy the rest of your day!