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Tuesday the 15th of March, 2005
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AT vs. IN (2)

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Good morning. Yesterday we looked at the difference between AT and IN as prepositions of location. Today we will look at AT and IN as prepositions of time. The best way to remember the difference between these time expressions is to associate the preposition with the specific time expression. This means that when you learn a new expression or phrase (for example, o'clock), you should learn the preposition that goes with the phrase (at 9 o'clock). AT We use this preposition with these time expressions: --> at + hour (1 o'clock, half past two, etc.) --> at the moment --> at night --> at the time (a la hora) --> at the beginning, at the start, at the end of something Examples: I get home from work at half past seven. The television program you want to watch begins at 9 p.m. He's having a shower at the moment, so he can't answer the phone. The detective asked them what they had been doing at the time of the robbery. We'll serve cocktails at the start of the party. I have also planned a special surprise for all of the guests at the end. IN We use this preposition with these time expressions: --> in + year --> in + month --> in + season --> in + the morning/the afternoon/the evening (NOT night!) --> in time (a tiempo) Examples: I was born in 1966. All of us were born in June. It doesn't usually snow in winter there. The repairman is coming in the morning. I didn't get home in time to watch my favourite television program. Tomorrow we will look at some different popular expressions that use AT or IN. If you have any questions about these words so far, please don't hesitate to contact me. Have a great day!



Monday the 14th of March, 2005
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AT vs. IN (1)

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Good morning. I hope you had a good weekend. This week's Daily Vitamins are based on a question from Susana S. Susana wanted to know the difference between the prepositions AT and IN. These prepositions are easy to confuse because they are both prepositions of location (to say where something is) and prepositions of time (to say when something happens). In addition, we can find AT and IN in different expressions and in combination with other verbs and adjectives. Today we will look at AT and IN as prepositions of location. AT We use this preposition to say where something or somebody is. We also use it to refer to a particular place: -->with complete addresses --> in the phrases at work and at home --> to refer to shops and businesses in phrases like: at the doctor's, at the butcher's --> to talk about an activity somewhere: at a party, at a meeting, at lunch, at dinner Examples: I live at 297 Hamilton Road. John is at work. He won't get home until 6 p.m. I'm afraid I left my books at home. I saw Lucy at work yesterday. There were so many customers at the butcher's that I decided not to wait. They met at a party. Shall I see you at the meeting this afternoon? He told us about the project at lunch. IN We use this preposition to say where something is: --> inside a room--container--building--vehicle --> within a geographical area (a city, a country etc.) --> within an object--space--substance --> held or enclosed by something (in your hands--arms etc.) Examples: Your books are in the bedroom. Your clothes are in the wardrobe. I work in that building over there. The children are waiting in the car. There aren't very many parks in the city. I can't find a pen. Are you sure there's one in your pencil case? Waiter, there's a fly in my soup. Put your head in your arms and don't look! I want it to be a surprise. The main difference between AT and IN for location is that: IN expresses the idea that an object is surrounded by or inside something else AT is usually used to talk about the activities that take place somewhere. Tomorrow we will look at the difference between AT and IN for expressions of time. If you have any questions about these words so far, please don't hesitate to contact me. Have a productive day!



Friday the 11th of March, 2005
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UNTIDY or MESSY

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Good morning. Yesterday we looked at the adjectives tidy and neat. They mean: to be in the correct place; to be organized properly; to be arranged in a nice way. Today we look at two adjectives with the opposite meaning. Today's words are: untidy or messy (adjectives) They mean: NOT neat or tidy; things are in the wrong place or not organized properly or not arranged in a nice way. Example 1: My desk is always very untidy, but I know where everything is. Example 2: Your hair is awfully messy. It must be very windy today? Example 3: I could never live with an untidy person. I can't stand it when my house is messy. Messy can also be used as a noun: a mess. A mess refers to: a place that is untidy or messy. Example 4: Your parents are coming in an hour and the house is a mess! Please help me clean up. If you have any questions about this word, please don't hesitate to contact me. Have a nice day and an excellent weekend!



Thursday the 10th of March, 2005
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TIDY or NEAT

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Good morning. Today's words are: tidy or neat (adjectives) They mean: that things are in the correct place, organised properly or arranged in a nice way. Example 1: She keeps her work area very tidy. Everything is in its correct place. Example 2: One of the children's chores (tareas de casa) is to keep their bedrooms neat. Everything is in its correct place. Example 3: Before you go into the interview, make sure your clothes are tidy and your hair is neat. It's important to create a good impression. Tidy can also be used as a verb: to tidy. It means: to organize or arrange something properly; to make something tidy. Example 4: If you tidy the sitting room, I'll hoover the floors (pasar la aspiradora). If you have any questions about this word, please don't hesitate to contact me. Enjoy the rest of your day!



Wednesday the 09th of March, 2005
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SPARE

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Good morning. Today's word is: spare (adjective) It means: something you have in addition to other similar objects so that it is available when you need it; an extra object. Example 1: You must keep a spare tyre in your car in case of a road accident. Example 2: I've given a spare key to the neighbour so that if I ever lock myself out of my flat, I won't have to call a locksmith. Example 3: You can stay with us when you come to town, if you like. We have a spare room for guests. The word spare is also used in the expression spare time. Spare time means: time when you do not have to work or study and you can do what you like. Example 4: I like reading or going to the cinema in my spare time. If you have any questions about this word, please don't hesitate to contact me. I will answer you when I have some spare time. I hope you have a good day!