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Tuesday the 31st of May, 2005
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GROW vs. GROW UP

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Good morning. Today we are going to learn the difference between the words grow and grow up, two verbs which often cause confusion since the Spanish translation for both of them is crecer. GROW It means: to increase in size; to become bigger, taller or longer. (This is the most common meaning; however, if you have a good English-English dictionary, you can find other meanings.) Example 1: You're getting to be such a big girl! I'm sure you have grown at least 20 cm. since the last time I saw you. Example 2: This plant does not seem to be growing. Perhaps I should use fertilizer. GROW UP It means: to change from being a baby or young child to being an older child or young adult. We can use this verb to describe different aspects of the growing-up process (how, where and when we grew up ). Example 3: My son is growing up so fast. It seems he was a baby in my arms just yesterday and now he's going to school. Example 4: Although I was born in England, I grew up in Canada. As you can see, both verbs can be used to talk about our childhood, but they have a different focus. Grow refers to the physical increase in size and grow up refers more globally to the process of changing from a child to an adult. If you have understood the difference between these verbs and can use them correctly, then we can say that your vocabulary has grown a little! (Not grown up!). If the difference is not clear, please don't hesitate to contact us. Enjoy your day!



Monday the 30th of May, 2005
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TALKATIVE

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Good morning. I hope you had a good weekend. Today we are going to finish our review of the word talk, with the adjective form: TALKATIVE Meaning: a person who talks a lot is talkative. Example 1: My sister-in-law is so talkative that it's impossible to get a word in edgewise.* * to get a word in edgewise is an expression that means to be able to take part in the conversation. We usually use this expression with a negative word or expression to indicate that someone else won't let us speak ("I can't get a word in edgewise"). Example 2: My mother says I was very talkative as a baby, but I don't think that's true anymore. The opposite of talkative is quiet. Example 3: Lucy is a quiet child in general, but she enjoys talking about her hobbies. I hope we have answered your question satisfactorily, Maribel. If you have any questions about the word talk in any of its forms, please don't hesitate to contact us. Have a good day!



Friday the 27th of May, 2005
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TALK (4)

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Good morning. Today we're going to look at the word talk in its noun form. TO HAVE A TALK Meaning: a conversation with someone or about something. Example 1: Yesterday the director had a talk with the staff about the budget. Example 2: My teacher wants to have a talk with my parents about my exam results. TO GIVE (or DELIVER) A TALK Meaning: an informal lecture on a subject. Example 3: I get so nervous whenever I have to give a talk to my colleagues at work. Example 4: Mr. Fredson has asked someone to come in and deliver a talk on the new regulations that will affect our department. On Monday we will finish by looking at talk in its adjective form. If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please don't hesitate to contact us. Have a good day and an excellent weekend!



Thursday the 26th of May, 2005
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TALK (3)

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Good day. This week we have been learning expressions with the verb to talk. Today we look at two more expressions. TO TALK SOME SENSE INTO SOMEONE Meaning: to persuade someone to act in a sensible way. Example 1: When I was a teenager, my mother tried to talk some sense into me about my clothes, but I refused to listen. I would only wear what I wanted to, which was usually very expensive and trendy. TO TALK DOWN TO SOMEONE Meaning: to talk to someone as if they were inferior or less intelligent than you. Example 2: I can't stand Ronald from the finance department. I find he often talks down to anybody who hasn't been in the firm as long as he has. If you ask me, he's an arrogant know-it-all! Tomorrow we will look at the noun form of talk. If you have any questions about the expressions we have looked at so far this week, please don't hesitate to contact us. Have a good day!



Wednesday the 25th of May, 2005
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TALK (2)

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Good morning. Yesterday we looked at the basic meaning of the verb talk (to have a conversation). Today we are going to look at how this meaning changes when we combine talk with other words. TO TALK SOMEONE INTO DOING SOMETHING Meaning: to convince or persuade someone to do something. Example 1: Did you manage to talk Beth into coming to the party? She told me she was busy but I know she would enjoy herself if she came. TO TALK SOMEONE OUT OF DOING SOMETHING Meaning: to convince or persuade someone NOT to do something. Example 2: I tried to talk Kevin and Robert out of going on holiday to the Caribbean during the rainy season but they went anyway. Of course, it rained every day and they weren't able to go to the beach at all. Tomorrow we will look at some more expressions with talk. If you have any questions about today's expressions, please don't hesitate to contact us. I hope you have a great day!