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Tuesday the 30th of September, 2008
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KICK EXPRESSIONS-1

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Hello again everyone.

As I mentioned yesterday, this week we will look at some common English expressions that use the word kick in them.

Today's first expression is: to kick the habit

Meaning: to stop doing something that is harmful, and which you have been doing for a long time (such as using drugs or alcohol).

Example 1
He had been smoking for 30 years, and then he kicked the habit. I am very happy for him!

Example 2
I'm sure that if she could kick her drug habit, she would stay out of prison.

Today's second expression is: to kick back (especially in US English) informal

Meaning: to relax

Example 3
Please just kick back and enjoy the flight.

Remember that if you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, you should post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Enjoy the rest of your day!



Monday the 29th of September, 2008
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GET YOUR KICKS

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Good morning everyone. I hope you had a good weekend.

Today we are going to answer a question from one of our students, who of course also receives the Daily Vitamin:

Hi!
I have a question: what does "GET YOUR KICKS ON ROUTE 66" mean? Thank you for your help!
Àngels


Of course, Àngels is referring to the famous pop song composed in 1946 by American songwriter, Bobby Troup (and later recorded by Chuck Berry in 1961 and the Rolling Stones in 1964, among others). This song is about the famous US highway (UK=motorway) which went from Illinois to California.

To get your kicks is a very informal way of saying to have fun, to feel pleasure or to have a good time.

Today's expression is: To get one's kicks from / out of...

Meaning: a strong feeling of excitement or pleasure.

Example 1:
Paul Newman got a kick out of driving fast cars.

Example 2:
John: What do you do for kicks Sarah?
Sarah: I love to go moose hunting.

Example 3:
He gets his kicks from snow skiing.

The English word kick (Spanish = patada or dar patadas) is used in a lot of English expressions. This week we will look at some of them.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Have a good day.



Friday the 26th of September, 2008
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VERB TO DO-2 (AUXILIAR)

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Good morning!

Today we continue our review of the verb DO, this time as an auxiliary verb.

Uno de los usos del verbo DO, como auxiliar, es para formar frases interrogativas y negativas.

En inglés, para formar una frase interrogativa o negativa (en pasado o presente simple) necesitamos el auxiliar DO. Considera los siguientes ejemplos.

1) Do you like tennis? (¿Te gusta el tenis?)
2) No, I don't like tennis. (No, no me gusta el tenis.)
3) Did you go to the cinema yesterday? Yes, I did. (¿Fuiste ayer al cine? Sí, fui.)

No es necesario usar el DO en preguntas y frases negativas con el verbo TO BE.

4) Are you Spanish? (¿Eres español?)
5) No, I'm not (No, no lo soy.)

Es posible encontrar una frase con el verbo auxiliar DO combinado con el verbo normal DO (=hacer).

6) What do you do? (¿A qué te dedicas?)

En el ejemplo (6), el primer DO es auxiliar, y el segundo es el verbo normal (=hacer).

That is all for today.

Si tienes preguntas sobre el contenido de la Essential Weekly Vitamin de hoy, por favor usa el foro en la sección Daily Vitamin Plus! en nuestra página web (www.ziggurat.es). Para más información sobre la DVPlus!, no dudes en ponerte en contacto con nosotros.

Have a great weekend!



Thursday the 25th of September, 2008
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CLOTHING EXPRESSIONS-6

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Hello again everyone.

Today we finish our look at English expressions that use clothing. Today we will look at a very informal slang expression with the word knickers (bragas). (In American English, it's more common to use the word panties or women's underwear to refer to bragas.)

Today's expression is: to get your knickers in a twist

Meaning: to become angry, confused or upset.

Example 1
Sarah: John...John...I want to invade Russia if we win the election!
John: Okay, okay...don't get your knickers in a twist. Let's worry about winning the election first!

Tomorrow (Friday) we will send the Essential Weekly Vitamin, designed for beginner Spanish-speaking students of English. Remember that i
f you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Have a great day!



Tuesday the 23rd of September, 2008
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CLOTHING EXPRESSIONS-5

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Good morning.

Today we continue our look at English clothing expressions, this time with the word boot (bota). 

Today's first expression is: to be given the boot or to get the boot (informal)

Meaning: to be told that you must leave your job or that a relationship you are having with someone is over.

Example 1
Due to poor performance, the CEO will most likely get the boot next month.

We can also use this expression to mean forcing someone to leave a place (to boot someone out of a place).

Example 2
He was so drunk that the bartender finally booted him out of the bar. Thank God!

Today's second expression is: the boot is on the other foot (in American English, the shoe is on the other foot)

Meaning: used to say that a situation has changed so that someone now has the power or authority over the person who used to have the power or authority over them. 

Example 3:
In the past Europe had great influence over China's economy, but the boot is on the other foot now.  

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Enjoy the rest of your day!