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Friday the 26th of March, 2010
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DEAL-3

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning.

Seguimos con nuestro repaso de usos y significados del verbo inglés deal.

Today's meaning of deal is: what is happening or what is going to happen. It is quite colloquial and it is usually only used in spoken English.
(El significado de deal de hoy es: lo que está pasando o lo que va a pasar. Es bastante coloquial y normalmente se usa solamente en inglés hablado.)

Example 1:
So what's the deal? Is your mother-in-law coming or not?
(Pues entonces ¿qué pasa? ¿Vendrá tu suegra o no?)

Example 2:
Speaker 1: Will you please tell me what the deal is?
(¿Me puedes decir, por favor, cuál es el plan?)
Speaker 2: Yes. We're going to meet in 10 minutes in the plaza.
(Sí. Hemos quedado en la plaza dentro de 10 minutos.)

Recuerda que no enviaremos la Daily Vitamin ni la Essential Weekly Vitamin entre el 29 de marzo y el 5 de abril. Después de Semana Santa, enviaremos la primera Daily Vitamin el martes, 6 de abril.

I hope you have a nice day and a great Easter Week!



Thursday the 25th of March, 2010
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TO FIRE (REVISION)

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning.

Yesterday we looked at the verb to hire. Today's expression has the opposite meaning.

Today's expression is: to fire or to be fired

It means: to eliminate a worker because you are not satisfied with his/her job performance.

Example 1(a):
The new boss fired Nicholas because he always arrives late to work.

Example 1(b):
Nicholas was fired by the new boss because he always arrives late to work.

Example 2(a):
In Spain, if a worker is fired without just cause, he must be paid compensation.

Example 2(b):
In Spain, if a company fires a worker without just cause, they must pay him compensation.

Another common, more informal, way of expressing fired is to sack / to be/get sacked (especially in UK English).

Example 3:
In Spain, if a company sacks a worker without just cause, they must pay him/her compensation.

Remember that tomorrow we will send the Essential Weekly Vitamin for Spanish-speaking students of English.

Please also remember that we will not send the Daily Vitamin or the Essential Weekly Vitamin between March 29th and April 5th. The first Daily Vitamin after the break will be Tuesday, April 6th.

I hope you have a nice day and a great Easter Week.



Wednesday the 24th of March, 2010
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TO HIRE-2 (REVISION)

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning.

Today's expression is: to hire or to be hired

It means: to give someone a new job or to get a new job.

Example 1:
Our company is going to hire fifty new employees.

Example 2(a):
If you want that company to hire you, you need to give a good impression in the interview.

Example 2(b):
If you want to be hired by that company, you need to give a good impression in the interview.

A synonym for to hire is to employ.

Example 3:
He wanted to employ qualified, experienced workers for the position.

If you have any questions about today's lesson, please post your comments by clicking on the "Add a Comment" button in the Daily Vitamin section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

I hope you have a nice day.



Tuesday the 23rd of March, 2010
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TO MOVE UP THE LADDER (REVISION)

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning.

Yesterday we looked at the expression to get your foot in the door. Once you get your foot in the door and have established yourself in a new company, today's expression might describe the next step.

Today's expression is: to move up the ladder

It means: to get a better job or position in an organization.

Example 1:
Alison was so efficient and reliable at her job that she soon began to move up the ladder. I wouldn't be surprised if she eventually became the managing director.

Example 2:
David thinks that the only way to move up the corporate ladder is to be a 'yes Man' and do everything that the boss asks him to do without questions or complaints. He makes the rest of us look terrible!

A synonym for this expression is to get a promotion or to be promoted.

Example 3:
David wants to get a promotion / be promoted, so he is working overtime to show his superiors what a good worker he is.

If you have any questions about today's lesson, please post your comments by clicking on the "Add a Comment" button in the Daily Vitamin section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Have a nice day.



Monday the 22nd of March, 2010
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TO GET YOUR FOOT IN THE DOOR (REVISION)

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning. I hope all of you had a great weekend. 

This week we're going to review a series of Daily Vitamins related to mobility in the workplace; these Daily Vitamins were originally sent in November of 2004.

Today's expression is: to get/have your foot in the door.

It means: to get an opportunity to start working in a new job or in a new business. We often use this expression to talk about job opportunities that we consider especially valuable or interesting.

Example 1:
By doing volunteer work in the company, Janet was able to get her foot in the door. When her employers saw how well she worked, they decided to give her a permanent position.

Example 2:
Robert thinks he has his foot in the door just because his cousin is the Director of Human Resources. However, I'm not so sure because he isn't really qualified for the position.

If you have any questions about today's content, please post your comments by clicking on the "Add a Comment" button in the Daily Vitamin section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Enjoy the rest of your day.