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Wednesday the 30th of November, 2016
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WORDY WEDNESDAY: SHOP 'TIL YOU DROP

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Hello and good morning to everyone! How's your week going?

The Friday after Thanksgiving is the crazy (and strange) tradition called Black Friday.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Friday_(shopping)

What an odd way to spend the day after Thanksgiving!

Black Friday
is the perfect time to use our Wordy Wednesday expression: SHOP 'TIL YOU DROP.

Definition
: to shop until you're so tired you could fall over.

Example 1: If I won the lottery, I would shop until I dropped!

Example 2: I got some money for my birthday. Let's shop til we drop!

You can use the word UNTIL, or you can shorten this word and say 'TIL.

That's all for today. Have you ever shopped until you dropped? Tell us (on our Facebook page) about a time when you had a crazy shopping spree!

https://www.facebook.com/ZigguratLanguageServices/

Thanks for reading!


Tuesday the 29th of November, 2016
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TENSE TUESDAY: WORDS USED WITH PRESENT PERFECT (SO FAR)

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Hello to everyone, and happy Tuesday. Are you ready for another lesson on English grammar?

Last week we looked at words often used with the Present Perfect. We are continuing this today by looking at the adverbial phrase SO FAR.

We use SO FAR with the Present Perfect to show what we have done, starting at a point in the past, up until the present moment; it is an activity in progress. Therefore... SO FAR is often used to show that the action is not completed, and that we plan to continue this action into the near future.

Example 1: So far I've been to 19 countries. / I've been to 19 countries so far.

This speaker in Example 1 probably has plans to travel more in the future, so going to foreign countries is an activity in progress.

Example 2
: I've only read 10 pages of this book so far and I already love it.

This person plans to continue reading the book.

Example 3
: So far I've met all of my fiancé's siblings, but none of her aunts or uncles.

This person will meet more family members in the future.

As you can see, we can place this adverbial phrase before the Present Perfect or at the end of the phrase.

That's all for today. Thanks for reading!


Monday the 28th of November, 2016
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MISSING MONDAY: CHOOSE THE TENSE

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Good morning to all of you Daily Vitamin readers! I hope everyone had an excellent weekend.

For Missing Monday, we are challenging you to use the correct tense to complete the sentence below.

Sentence: So far in my class I _____ a lot.

You must use the correct tense of the verb TO LEARN.

There might be more than one possibility, but we are looking for the most coherent answer possible with the little context we have. Specifically, we are looking for a tense that is commonly used with the expression SO FAR.

If this is confusing you, then be sure to read tomorrow's Tense Tuesday because it focuses on this idea!

Leave us your answer on our Facebook or Twitter pages and we will post the correct answer soon.

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/ZigguratLanguageServices/

Twitter
https://twitter.com/englishdaily

Thanks for participating!


Friday the 25th of November, 2016
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PHRASAL VERB FRIDAY: EAT UP

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Hello and happy Friday to everyone!

On Wednesday we looked at the Thanksgiving-related word, STUFFED. Today, the day after Thanksgiving, we are looking at a phrasal verb that is related to eating: TO EAT UP.

Definition: to eat all of something.

Example 1: Wow you ate up your lunch very quickly! You were hungry!

Example 2
: Here's your sandwich. Eat it up!

Example 3
: Every time my grandmother makes a pie, we eat it up in a few minutes.

As you can see from the examples, this phrasal verb can be SEPARATED.

That's all for today, and this concludes our lessons for the week. Thanks for reading! I wish you a wonderful weekend.


Thursday the 24th of November, 2016
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THEME THURSDAY: FAMOUS NOVEL OPENINGS ('CHROMOS')

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Hello and good morning, everyone!

Welcome to our last Theme Thursday for November (although we will continue with this them in December). This month we are looking at famous first lines from novels. We discuss why we like these sentences and also look at the grammar in each sentence.

Today we are looking at the book Chromos by Felipe Alfau (1990).

Sentence
: The moment one learns English, complications set in.

As English teachers and learners, I think we can all agree with this sentence! We like this line because it uses two interesting concepts: the gender-neutral subject pronoun ONE and the use of the phrasal verb TO SET IN.

The author uses ONE as a subject. It is the same as using the words "a person." This is a formal construction, so this novel begins with a formal sentence.

Example 1
: When one exercises, one stays healthy.

TO SET IN is a phrasal verb.

Definition: to begin (and continue) something that is usually unpleasant.

Example 1: After the first week of work, reality set in. I didn't like my job.

Example 2: Once the politician's term set in, I realized I had voted for the wrong person.

What do you think the sentence "[t]he moment one learns English, complications set in" means? We would love to hear your interpretation. Tell us on our Facebook page!

https://www.facebook.com/ZigguratLanguageServices/


That's all for today. Thanks for reading!