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Friday the 24th of December, 2004
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TAKE A LEAVE OF ABSENCE

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Good morning. Today we are going to finish expressions related to not working or holidays. Today's expression is: to take a leave of absence It means: to not work for a period of time, but it is not a holiday. People usually take a leave of absence for personal reasons, such as study or travel. You don't usually get paid if you take a leave of absence. Example 1: I'd like to take a leave of absence to finish my doctoral studies, but I don't have enough money. Example 2: Joan's job was so stressful that he decided to take a leave of absence and look for a more enjoyable job. A similar expression is: to go (or be) on leave Example 3: Lisa is planning to go on leave until her children are old enough to start school. If you are a teacher, you can take a period of time away from work in order to rest, study or travel. This time period is called a sabbatical. Example 4: Martin is a French teacher in Boston. He took a sabbatical last year to live in Paris because he wanted to practice French with native speakers. Hopefully, whatever your job is, you'll have some time off this December to enjoy the holidays! If you have any questions about any of these expressions related to holidays, please don't hesitate to contact me. Have a great weekend, and remember that today is the last Daily Vitamin until Monday, January 10th. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!!

Thursday the 23rd of December, 2004
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TO TAKE SICK LEAVE

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Good morning. Yesterday we looked at the expression to take a day off to mean to have a holiday from work. Of course, sometimes you can't work because you are ill. Today's expression is: to take sick leave It means: not to work because of illness or sickness. Example 1: He took sick leave until he was fully recovered from the flu (gripe). If you are going to have a baby (to give birth), you can also take maternity leave. Example 2: If you live in the state of Spain, you can take four months maternity leave. In these expressions, the word leave is used as a noun. We can also use this noun with the verbs get (= receive) or go on (= take). Examples: Women in Spain get four months maternity leave. I'm looking forward to going on maternity leave next month. If you have any questions about these expressions, please don't hesitate to contact me. Enjoy the rest of your day!

Wednesday the 22nd of December, 2004
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TO TAKE A DAY OFF

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Good morning. December is a month of many holidays in Catalonia and the rest of Spain. The month begins with a long weekend and continues with the Christmas and New Year's holidays. For the next few days we're going to look at different ways to express days or periods when we aren't working, depending on what the reasons for not working are. Today's expression is: to take a day off It means: to take a holiday from work. You can also take a week or a month off (if your boss is generous!). We often use this expression when it is the worker who decides not to work for personal reasons. Example 1: I took a day off in order to go to my best friend's wedding. Example 2: I get to take 3 weeks off each year for holidays, but I don't have to take all of the days off at the same time. For example, I can take a week off in the spring and then 2 more weeks off in the summer. If you have any questions about this expression, please don't hesitate to contact me. Have a great day!

Tuesday the 21st of December, 2004
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TELEPHONE ENGLISH-7 (SAYING GOODBYE)

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Good morning. Today we are going to finish telephone expressions by focusing on Saying Goodbye. We will also include a dialogue that incorporates telephone expressions from the Daily Vitamins that we've seen over the past week. Saying Goodbye Workplace (Formal): You can use one of the following expressions (or a combination of them) to end your phone calls. The way you end a call will depend on whether you are the caller or if someone else called you: Thank you for calling. Thank you for your time. It was nice talking to you. I look forward to talking to you again soon. I look forward to hearing from you soon. Please call me back as soon as you can. We'll talk again soon. Goodbye. At Home (Informal): Some more informal expressions for ending your phone calls are: Thanks for calling. I'll talk to you soon. (Talk to you soon.) I'll call you back later. Bye. Example Telephone Conversation in the Workplace: Receptionist: Good morning. ABC Industries. How can I help you? Caller: Good morning. I'd like to speak to Mr. Kelly in the Marketing Department. R.: Who's calling, please? C.: This is Mrs. Long. R.: One moment please, Mrs. Long, while I put your call through. (PAUSE) R.: I'm sorry. Mr. Kelly isn't available at this moment. Would you like to leave a message? C.: Could you ask him to call Janet Long at 883 7718, please? I'm in the office mornings and afternoons. R.: Janet Long at 883 7718. Okay...I'll pass the message on to him. C.: Thank you very much. R.: You're welcome. Goodbye. C.: Goodbye. I'd like to thank Vicky C. again for her request for Telephone English. As you can see, it's a language area with many useful expressions. Hopefully, you will find some of these expressions useful in your workplace or the next time you have to make a phone call in English. As usual, if you have any questions about these expressions, please don't hesitate to contact me. Enjoy the rest of your day!

Monday the 20th of December, 2004
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TELEPHONE ENGLISH-6 (TAKING OR LEAVING A MESSAGE)

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Good morning, I hope everyone had a good weekend. Today we are going to continue with telephone English expressions. So far we have looked at greetings, asking to speak to other people, identifying yourself and making the connection. Today we include expressions for taking and leaving messages. If the person you ask for is not available, following are some expressions you may hear: NAME is not available right now. NAME can't take your call at this moment. NAME can't come to the phone right now. NAME is talking on the other line. You may be asked to leave a message: Would you like to leave a message? Can I take a message? Can I give HIM/HER a message? More Complete Examples: George Miller isn't available right now. Would you like to leave a message? Betty can't come to the phone right now. Can I take a message? If you are the caller, you can also ask to leave a message: Can you give NAME a message for me? Can I leave a message for NAME? Could you ask NAME to call me back, please? More Complete Examples: Can I leave a message for Mr. Miller? Can you ask Betty to call me back, please? Tomorrow we'll finish telephone expressions. If you have any questions about these expressions, please don't hesitate to contact me. Have a good day!