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Friday the 28th of November, 2008
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SAYING GOOD-BYE

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning!

Hoy os voy a presentar algunos formulismos que utilizamos para despedirnos de la gente, y unos ejemplos de su uso:

Have a nice day / evening / weekend / holiday / etc.

Have a nice... se traduce como "que tengas un buen…", al cual se le añade las palabras día, tarde, fin de semana, vacaciones, etc.

See you tomorrow / on Monday / next week / etc.

See you... en este caso se traduce por la preposición "hasta". Entonces, la traducción del ejemplo anterior sería Hasta mañana, hasta el lunes, hasta la semana que viene, etc.

See you later! (¡Hasta luego! o ¡Nos vemos luego!)

See you! (¡Nos vemos!)

Take care! (¡Cuídate!)

Veamos algunos ejemplos:
 
Example1:
Friday evening at work (el viernes por la tarde en el trabajo):
Ann: OK Janet, time to go home. Do you have any plans for the weekend?
(Bueno Janet, es hora de volver a casa. ¿Tienes planes para el fin de semana?)
Janet: No, nothing special.
(No, nada especial.)
Ann: OK, well...have a nice weekend!
(Vale, bueno... ¡que tengas un buen fin de semana!)
Janet: Thanks! You too! See you on Monday.
(¡Gracias! ¡Tú también! Nos vemos el lunes.)

Example 2:
Two friends at university (dos amigos en la universidad)
Mike: Hi John. Where are you going?
(Hola John. ¿A dónde vas?)
John: To the library to study for this afternoon's exam! And you?
(A la biblioteca para estudiar para el examen de esta tarde. ¿Y tú?)
Mike: I have an appointment with the tutor.
(Tengo una reunión/cita con el tutor.)
John: OK, see you later!
(Vale, ¡nos vemos luego!)
Mike: Yeah, see you!
(Sí, ¡nos vemos!)

Example 3:
At the airport (en el aeropuerto)
Jeff: OK... that was the last call for my flight. I have to go.
(Vale... ha sido el último aviso para mi vuelo. Tengo que irme.)
Alex: Ok Jeff, have a nice flight.
(Ok Jeff, que tengas un buen vuelo.)
Jeff: Thanks. See you in two weeks.
(Gracias. Nos vemos en dos semanas.)
Alex: Ok. Take care.
(Vale. Cuídate.)
Jeff: You too.
(Tú también.)

Example 4:
A couple at home in the morning (una pareja en casa por la mañana)
Jack: Darling, I'm going to work! I'll be back at 6pm.
(Cariño, ¡me voy al trabajo! Volveré a las seis de la tarde.)
Julie: OK, see you later!
(Vale, ¡nos vemos luego!)

Si tienes cualquier duda sobre el contenido de la vitamina de hoy, puedes preguntarnos a través del foro de la sección Daily Vitamin Plus! en nuestra página web (www.ziggurat.es).

Have a nice day and a great weekend!



Thursday the 27th of November, 2008
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THROW SOMETHING OR SOMEBODY OFF

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning. 

Today's expression is: to throw something/somebody off

Meaning 1: to manage to get rid of something or someone that is bothering you, making you suffer, etc.

Example 1:
Despite staying at home, taking lots of vitamin C and drinking lots of liquids, Judith has not been able to throw off her horrible cold (catarro). I hope she feels better soon.

Example 2:
Sometimes when I go to bed at night, I am unable to throw off my worries, and I can't get to sleep.

Meaning 2: to quickly and carelessly remove a piece of clothing.

Example 3:
She came in from the rain and threw off her wet coat.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es). Remember that tomorrow we will send the Essential Weekly Vitamin designed for Spanish-speaking students of English.

Enjoy the rest of your day.



Wednesday the 26th of November, 2008
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THROW SOMETHING TOGETHER

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning. 

Today we are going to look at another expression with the verb throw.

Today's expression is: to throw something together

Meaning: to produce, create or make something very quickly.

Example 1:
Often times I don't have a lot of time for lunch, so I thrown together a quick meal. It's not always healthy, but it's quick.

Example 2:
When the economic crisis hit, the government quickly threw together a rescue plan with very little money behind it. I don't know if it will work.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Have a good day!



Tuesday the 25th of November, 2008
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THROW IN THE TOWEL

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning. 

Today's expression is: to throw in the towel

Meaning: to admit that you have been defeated or have failed, and to stop trying.

Apparently, this phrase comes from boxing, since a fighter indicates surrender by throwing a towel into the boxing ring.

Example 1:
Despite losing the election, John McCain has not thrown in the towel on his political career. He will continue to serve in the US Senate.

Example 2:
Due to the company filing for bankruptcy, the union was forced to throw in the towel and settle their dispute with the company.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please don't throw in the towel trying to understand...just post your questions in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

I hope you enjoy the rest of your day.



Monday the 24th of November, 2008
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LEARN vs. LEARNT

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning. I hope you enjoyed your weekend.

We have received another interesting question from Belén and Christian, two Ziggurat students who are currently studying English abroad. Today's question is much easier than the differences between Rise, Arise and Raise. Here is their newest question.

Nosotros pensábamos que learned y learnt querían decir lo mismo y se usaban indistintamente, sin embargo la gente de aquí dice que hay una sutil diferencia en el modo de usarlas, pero no nos lo saben explicar. Muchas gracias por la ayuda y recuerdos para todos!!!!
-
Belén y Christian.

Both learned and learnt are different forms of the past tense and past participle of the verb TO LEARN. The basic difference between these two alternative spellings is that learned is more common in US English and learnt is more common in UK English. However, depending on the dialect, you can see variation. (For example, a Canadian friend of mine says he uses both.)

There are other verbs that act the same way. Again, the -ed version of these past tense or past participle forms is more common in the US and the -t ending is more common in the UK. All of the following verbs are irregular.

--> burned-burnt
--> dreamed-dreamt
--> kneeled-knelt
--> leaned-leant
--> leaped-leapt
--> spelled-spelt
--> spilled-spilt
--> spoiled-spoilt

Example 1 (UK):
I've been studying English for 10 years and I feel like I haven't learnt a thing.

Example 2 (US):
I've been studying English for 10 years and I feel like I haven't learned a thing.

So, Belén and Christian, if a native speaker told you there is a subtle difference between these two, but they couldn't explain this difference, it's probably because there really isn't much of a difference. That's how languages are...they are constantly evolving and changing. Maybe you've discovered a linguistic change in motion. ;-)

If you have any questions about the content of today's Daily Vitamin, please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Have a great day!